Posts tagged as:

family traditions

Kokkinopefti: Red Eggs and Koulouria

04.01.2010
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THE RED FALLS. In Greek you say Kokkinopefti, and this very literal, symbolic description serves as one popular name for the day, Holy Thursday. The red comes down, washing what it may. In this case, eggs for Easter.
In Greece on Great Thursday—what some call Maundy Thursday in English (and which, when I was little, I heard [...]

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Mardi Gras Tradition: oreillettes à l’orange

02.15.2010
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Hey, wait! Where’s the recipe for Oreillettes à l’orange? Don’t worry, it’s only migrated to a new home on the Internet: www.acparker.com/blog

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Crêpes Not Groundhogs

02.03.2010

YESTERDAY I WAS FRENCH. Double nationality is nice that way: you can opt in and out. Sort of. If not in all bureaucratic matters, then at least culturally. Certainly in terms of cuisine. Yesterday, the second day of February, provided the perfect opportunity for me to jump the American ship, don a beret (no, not [...]

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Happy Birthday, Dad

01.13.2010

COULD IT BE TRUE, what my parents said as they walked through the door? That today was the first time they came to visit when no one else was around? That it was the first time we had a meal in my home, just the three of us together? This seems impossible. Yet while I [...]

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Mimi’s Buttermilk Cornbread

01.11.2010
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EVERYTHING STARTS WITH CORNBREAD. At least, that’s my attitude when it comes to preparing a proper Southern meal. You start with good cornbread and build around it.
Sometimes the architecture is elaborate: what springs up can be an entire Thanksgiving dinner with all the fixin’s (there is no turkey on our holiday table without my grandmother’s [...]

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Epiphany: the Galette des Rois

01.05.2010

I ALWAYS ASSUMED that Christmas ended a minute past 11:59 on the night of December twenty-fifth. I grew up, probably like most American children, thinking that the Twelve Days of Christmas started in mid-December and built to a climax on the day we opened gifts and (not always) dragged ourselves out in the cold to [...]

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“Bonne Année” Du Puy Lentil Soup

12.29.2009

WE LAUGH ABOUT lentils, but it’s like laughing with them, not at them. We laugh because one year a box burst open in my mother-in-law’s luggage; we spent twenty minutes picking tiny green bits out of her sweaters, skirts, shoes, and undergarments, and even then I think some made it back home with her. For [...]

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Kolyva: Food for the Departed

01.05.2009
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SOMETIMES BEING PART of a multi-cultural family, I feel like a fraud no matter where I turn. I am, at best, half Greek. I am second-generation American and have no history with the Greek Orthodox Church, being raised nominally Presbyterian. In an Orthodox service—although now I’ve been to quite a few—I still hesitate and watch [...]

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